The Art of the Install

As a photographer, installing Fiona Tan: Ascent gave me the chance to think about images and videography in a new light, you know… to step back, reconsider and reimagine. Spending time with Fiona Tan’s work this week has broadened my understanding of the collective importance of Mount Fuji and I am humbled to have been a part of this exhibit. – Corey Bryson, AGGV Preparator/Technician.

Granting Buddhist Research: Q&A with AGGV Curator Haema Sivanesan

AGGV Curator Haema Sivanesan is a recent recipient of a Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation research grant in the amount of $150,000. She was also awarded a $50,000 curatorial research fellowship from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. What is Sivanesan working on and why? Hint: it’s infinitely vast with neither a beginning nor an end. Therefore, let’s start with the present moment…

The Aesthetic Perceptions of Art

By Jon Tupper, AGGV Director

What’s really happening when people encounter art? How does it affect them? It’s a mystery researchers have pondered for centuries. Here at the Gallery, I think of visitors regarding Emily Carr’s towering west coast forests; or an intricate Japanese print; or the ghostly digital trees in an installation such as Kelly Richardson’s The Erudition, which appears in our current show Supernatural: Art, Technology and the Forest.

Beyond The Edges

“Perhaps mine is “environmental” sculpture, rather than geometric…I have never made anything not closely connected with the human being and his environment. Man and his longings, desires, his dwellings, the thresholds he passes over and his places of worship concern me; people, buildings, entrances through which people go in, come out; and the apprehension, the […]

Staff Pick: Brendan Tang’s Manga Ormolu

By Nicole Stanbridge, Curator of Engagement

“I chose a recent acquisition to our permanent collection by Vancouver-based artist Brendan Lee Satish Tang. Pictured above, Manga Ormolu Ver. 5.0 is a work from Tang’s Manga Ormolu series that uses the 18th-century French gilding technique known as ormolu and fuses it with inspiration from pop culture (in particular, Japanese anime and manga).”