Member Spotlight

Carollyne Yardley

LEVEL:
Curator’s Circle

MEMBER SINCE:
June 2011

HOW WE MET HER:
“I met Carollyne on one of the House Tours organized by the Associates. I was incredibly impressed by her dedication and focus. As I got to know her, I learned that she is really well informed about international contemporary art and attends the major art fairs.” Jon Tupper, Director

Q: What motivated you to become a member of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria?

Raised in Victoria, BC, my childhood years were shaped by visits to the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. I learned about Canadian women artists such as Emily Carr and Sophie Pemberton, and was inspired by the innovative art forms on display by both local and international artists. Each visit to the gallery invigorated my spirit, and provided me with a wealth of knowledge. The AGGV became a precious cultural experience for me. It was a window to a larger world, especially for my younger self, who as a child was insulated by island life and few travel opportunities.

As an adult, I decided to become a member of the AGGV to support the Gallery, and do my part to ensure future generations have the same access.

Q: What sparked your interest in the arts?

Ever since I was able to hold a crayon, I’ve known my life would be immersed in the arts. However, my first memory of Victoria was in the 1970’s on a sunny day in June. I was sitting with my parents on the park bench next to the totem pole by Kwakwaka’wakw artist Mungo Martin in Beacon Hill Park. It was at that moment, while on holiday, my parents decided to move to Victoria. Since then all my major life stories have been tied to an artist or artwork in some way.

Q: What exhibition/program have you recently enjoyed at the Gallery?

Most recently, I’ve enjoyed Carol Sawyer: The Natalie Brettshneider Archive exhibition. It provided me with an opportunity to learn more about female artists working in Vancouver and Victoria in the 1930’s and 40’s who have been long overlooked by the dominant systems of representation in the history of art.

Photo credit: Jen Steele Photography